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Table 1 Clinical data and outcome of ventriculitis or meningitis caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis

From: Ventriculitis due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis: two case reports

Case #
Gender
– Age
Underlying
disease
CSF
shunta
Time to
infectionb
Signs and
symptoms
Antimicrobial
therapy
Outcome Reference
(year)
Case #1
M – 74
years
Ventriculomegaly VPS 14 days Fever,
abdominal
pain, sweating
Vancomycinc +
rifampicin +
cefuroxime,
then
vancomycinc +
rifampicin, then
ciprofloxacin +
rifampicin
Recovered Sandoe
(2001)
Case #2
F – 10
months
Obstructive
hydrocephalus
VPS 3 days Fever,
irritability,
decreased
activity
Oxacillin Recovered Elliott
(2001)
Case #3
F –
16 years
Aqueduct
stenosis
VPS 2 years Fever, lethargy,
abdominal
complaint
Vancomycinc
then oxacillin
Recovered Elliott
(2001)
Case #4
M –
12 years
Obstructive
hydrocephalus
NDd - Fever,
headache,
vomiting,
lethargy
Vancomycinc +
cefotaxime,
then oxacillin +
rifampicin
Recovered Kaabia
(2002)
Case #5
M – 7
years
Tumor within the
posterior cranial
fossa
EVD 20 days Fever,
headache,
vomiting,
lethargy
Vancomycine Recovered This study
Case #6
M – 2
months
Malformation of
Galen's vein
EVD 19 days Fever, seizures,
impaired
consciousness
Vancomycine Recovered This study
  1. aCSF shunt, cerebrospinal fluid shunt included VPS or EVD.
  2. bFrom shunt placement to infection onset.
  3. cAdministered intravenously.
  4. dND = not described.
  5. eAdministered intrathecally.